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Digital Nation Agenda, Hyperconnected Ecosystem: Unlocking Potentials of Cities and Industries

August 19, 2019
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Cloud Services, hosted at TM ONE’s Twin Core Data Centre collect, store, process and analyse data real-time and seamlessly, powered with AI to produce valuable insights in various industries.

The world is at the advent of Industrial Revolution 4.0. Internet of Things, robotics, artificial intelligence and machine learning are all revolutionising the way businesses and cities operate. Whether in communities or industries, real time data collected from devices, machines and wearables produce important insights to solve many business and societal challenges.

IMPROVING QUALITY OF LIVES

With Connected City and Living Solutions

Reduce hours in traffic with Smart Traffic Lights, save electricity consumption with Smart Street Lights, know parking availability with Smart Parking.  

Today’s city planners, township developers, and communities are working together to build better and connected cities using advanced technologies.  

ADDRESSING INDUSTRIAL CHALLENGES

With Connected Utilities Solutions

Capture water data with Smart Water Management, featuring near-real time pipeline monitoring, water quality and water level sensing, to optimise and safeguard water supply.  

With Connected Agriculture Solutions

Collect, analyse and automate real-time data on soil acidity, water level and other farming parameters to produce quality agricultural products with Smart Agriculture.    

With Connected Manufacturing Solutions

Produce better output and improve delivery time with Fleet Management and Connected Workforce. Reduce maintenance cost with Smart Forklift and Smart Genset.  

INTEGRATE SEAMLESSLY, FOR A DIGITAL MALAYSIA

With TM ONE,

Integrated Operations Centre offers managed services from monitoring, tracking and alerting any incidents. 

Cloud Services, hosted at TM ONE’s Twin Core Data Centre collect, store, process and analyse data real-time and seamlessly, powered with Artificial Intelligence to produce valuable insights in various industries, such as agriculture, manufacturing, real estate, utilities and healthcare.

Designing future citizen services – Inspirations from our youth

September 16, 2021
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On the eve of Malaysia’s 64th National Day, I had the opportunity to engage with a few of our youth on their expectations for future citizen services. It was inspiring to see the passion, energy, and ideas flowing as they aspire to build a better tomorrow. The conversation helped me gain useful perspectives on what is important and possible next steps for us to build the next generation of citizen services. Here are my five (5) key takeaways from the session:

  1. A high benchmark in term of expectations – This generation has grown in a digital-first world and are the recipients of great customer experience (CX) from some of the world’s best brands. In the case of these six youngsters, it is best exemplified by Grab, Revolut, Etiqa, BigPay, AirAsia and Foxtons. Each of these companies has established incredible benchmarks in delivering intuitive, frictionless, personalised, efficient, and completely digital services. This is now the minimum benchmark for the delivery of next-generation citizen experience. Anything lower will only result in an unhappy citizen.
  2. A customer-centric view – The service delivery must be designed from the lens of the citizen and his or her life journey – from womb to tomb – all integrated into one place. The user or a citizen should be the centre and focus of service delivery. As the citizen traverses through the various stages of life, he or she should be able to access the services through a unified channel. This is in stark contrast to the way citizen services are delivered by individual agencies, requiring us to engage with each of them separately.
  3. Build the foundational layer – The first step would be to build and integrate some very essential components that are fundamental to digital experiences as we know them. Some of these include:
    1. Mobile-first and digital-first approach
    2. Single Sign-On for all services
    3. Consistent user interface/user experience (UI/UX) across all federal, state and municipal agency services
    4. Data-once – citizens need to enter data only once; it is shared subsequently by the various agencies
    5. Predictive – anticipate and pre-empt citizen needs
    6. Omni-channel and One-stop customer service
  4. Develop a digital coalition – Further sustained innovation in citizen services can be achieved only through open innovation and co-creation among government agencies, technology partners, citizens and the start-up ecosystem. Human needs and behaviour are extremely complex and unpredictable. Co-creation enables the delivery of better services in a dynamic manner by leveraging the capacity to use resources of a wider ecosystem. It should be treated as a fundamental requirement for the delivery of next-generation citizen services.
  5. Driving industry transformation – It was interesting to hear the youth pointed out that the biggest impact of digital on the country will reside in our ability to transform some of the essential citizen services, such as education and healthcare services. This proves that digital can help improve access to every section of the society. They also discussed about the urgent need to modernise our core infrastructure (such as ports) so that we can be competitive in the region.
Imri Mokhtar, Group Chief Executive Officer, Telekom Malaysia Berhad

I was immensely inspired – every youth on the panel was part of a social initiative. Beyond just sharing ideas, they involved themselves actively and contributed to help build a better Malaysia. The onus is now on us in the government and institutions to channel that same energy into driving collaborative projects and creating world-class citizen services.

Looking forward to this exciting future. Selamat Hari Malaysia!!

Rehabilitation of Nation’s Healthcare
Transforming Healthcare through the Post Pandemic Era

September 13, 2021
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The COVID-19 outbreak has placed a massive strain on the global healthcare sector’s workforce, infrastructure, and supply chain. Medical practitioners are exhausted, and healthcare systems are forced beyond limits to the brink of breaking down. Despite the many challenges, a decrease in revenues and rising operational costs, healthcare players continue to push forward, committed in providing high quality healthcare services to patients. Nonetheless, the pandemic has exposed the shortcomings of healthcare systems worldwide. Striking at the nation-building heart of many countries, the pandemic has significantly disrupted social, political, economic and healthcare systems around the world.

However, we have also seen the emergence of foundational shifts arising from COVID-19. Needle mover initiatives are being made globally by both public and private sectors, recognising the need to relook healthcare ecosystem modernisation towards a comprehensive, integrated digitisation and digitalisation. New coping strategies, involving the accelerated adoption of telemedicine, smart health and other technologies, are considered as imperatives. Amid these dynamics, public sectors, healthcare providers, players, and other stakeholders around the globe are being challenged to pivot, adapt, and innovate at speed to amplify the reach and effectiveness of healthcare.

The Digital Front Door 

A smart health approach typically makes use of interconnected technologies to embrace the entire spectrum of healthcare providers, consumers and researchers to ensure the delivery of cutting-edge care that is comprehensive, collaborative, efficient – recognising the needs of patients and their families as well as healthcare practitioners and administrators. The use of telemedicine, complemented by analytics, artificial intelligence (AI), data protection and scalable cloud ecosystem is gaining traction. The pandemic has opened doors for AI and other digital technologies to solve complex clinical and non-clinical problems.

A recent report published by McKinsey & Company highlights that telehealth utilisation has stabilised at levels 38X higher than before the pandemic. Similarly, consumer and provider attitudes toward telehealth have also improved. Investment in virtual care and digital health have broadly skyrocketed. Additionally, virtual healthcare models and business models are continuing to evolve.

However, some hurdles, such as concerns around technology security, need to be addressed. TM ONE has innovated a complete ecosystem of healthcare solutions, which is modular and interoperable with external systems connected via TM ONE Cloud α (pronounced as Cloud Alpha) and TM ONE Cybersecurity (CYDEC) to ensure world class security. McKinsey points out that, the ‘digital front door’ will not be closing as patients and providers have appreciated and embraced the convenience and flexibility of this type of care especially during the healthcare crisis. As we gradually move through and onwards into recovery, a key concern for any health system will be scaling and sustaining these digital interactions.

Driven by Human Experience

Consumers expect industry leaders to leverage on the momentum created in the pandemic to continue to propel healthcare forward, especially as good healthcare services is a key hallmark of sustainable future ready nation building. According to Deloitte, collaborations and the human experience are two (2) of six (6) pressing sector issues that are expected to shape and navigate the healthcare industry into and through the evolving ‘next normal’.

Healthcare technologies, which especially appeal to the digital first generation, has inspired deeper levels of activity, engagement and enhanced patient experience. A visit to the doctor is already a worrying experience for some without having to deal with the paperwork, hours of waiting time and patient care. On a wider front, consumers are using technology to monitor their health, measure fitness, order prescriptions and schedule doctor’s appointments. Eighty percent (80%) of consumers report that they are most likely to have another virtual visit even post pandemic. Pandemic experience has shown that the best path to effectively enabling digital solutions requires various levels of smart collaboration moving away from siloed record systems. Providing a comprehensive end-to-end integrated patients experience management platform with insights, one which is truly beneficial for consumers and patients — calls for collaborative arrangements, which embrace data platforms, disruptive entrants, public/private partnerships, and health system platforms integration.

TM ONE Healthcare understands the complexities of the healthcare industry. It will simplify the electronic medical records platform, and channel patients, healthcare providers and funders into a single, secured, standardised and cost-effective solution. With extensive experience in rolling out clinic management systems and electronic medical records, together with a dedicated team to maintain and provide adequate support to end users and partners, TM ONE Healthcare will ensure the best experience for all stakeholders.

TM Group CEO in Conversation With The Youth: Designing Future Citizen Services

August 31, 2021
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MERDEKA SPECIAL

As consumers, we have all embraced digital services wholeheartedly since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Businesses and Government agencies made great progress in making available digital services needed to ensure limited interruption to our lives. We have all been witness to amazing journeys of change, innovation, and transformation. As citizens and consumers, we have high expectations of new digital experiences. 

In conjunction with Merdeka Day, we decided to engage with the youth to understand their expectations of how citizen services could be more digital in the future. Accordingly, our Group Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of TM, Imri Mokhtar, hosted six (6) youth representing the diversity of Malaysia to hear from them, their expectations, aspirations, and hope for the future of public services.

This article is an edited transcript of the discussion. You can listen to the podcast episode in the upcoming weeks.

The participants:


Rakcana Kardnanithi
Lancaster University, MSc in Economics
Lancaster University, BSc (Hons) Economics & Data Science

Is passionate about leveraging data to solve the world’s biggest challenges. In a recent project, she studied the data on poverty-stricken states in India to help support the distribution of free school meals to students.

William Kiong
UCSI, BA (Hons) Accounting & Finance

Is currently a research analyst with Twimbit. He is passionate about the crypto market and blogging on LinkedIn. He is an avid sportsperson and aspiring entrepreneur. He also contributes his time to a social initiative aimed at empowering young refugees in Malaysia.

Asyraf Naim
LSE, BA (Hons) Accounting & Finance

Is a soon to be central banker and has a deep interest in financial markets, crypto and traditional precious metals. He worked at a Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO) to help improve access to the best tertiary education institutes in the world.

Sarah Shevaun*
Netherlands Maritime University College, BA (Hons) Maritime Law

A true blue Borneon and is the first President of Educity’s multi-varsity student senate. She conquered her fear of public speaking when she spoke at TedX UoSM in March 2020.

Eeman Mansor*
UiTM, LLB (Hons) Law

Is actively engaged in advocacy work, especially in children’s rights. She currently holds the position of Deputy Country Director of ASEAN Youth Advocacy Network Malaysia.

Mohamad Zulfarhan Ahmad Supiee
Imperial College London, BSc (Hons) Medical Biosciences

A Johorean who is passionate about laboratory research and the field of public health. He is the Vice President of Imperial College Malaysian Society and the Producer of Malaysian Night and is working to help foster bonds among Malaysian students.

Imri Mokhtar
UCL, BEng (Hons) Electronics Engineering
Cambridge Judge Business School, Business & Leadership Programs
Harvard Business School, Business & Leadership Programs

Group CEO, Telekom Malaysia Berhad (TM)
*Currently pursuing

Imri Mokhtar: What is a great customer experience for you? What is the best customer experience you have had so far? 

Rakcana Kardnanithi: Grab – Accessible and efficient.

Asyraf Naim: Revolut – Global personalised banking with great customer care.

Eeman Mansor: BigPay – An integrated view of finances in one picture, at a low currency exchange.

Sarah Shevaun: Etiqa.com – Quick and easy car insurance renewal.

William Kiong: Airasia.com – Travel made easy with end-to-end digital service in one app.

Mohamad Zulfarhan Ahmad Supiee: Foxtons (a UK based real estate agency) – Efficient and seamless digital contracts.

Current best customer experience should be the minimum expectation bar for future citizen services”Imri Mokhtar

Imri Mokhtar: What are the areas for improvement in public services today?

Asyraf Naim: A more concise and responsive contact centre.

Mohamad Zulfarhan Ahmad Supiee: Adoption of Cloud to enable real-time digital amendments, instead of redoing forms over the counter.

Eeman Mansor: A uniformed user interface or user experience across different state government agencies websites to make it easy for data entry.

Rakcana Kardnanithi: A unified public service. Most public agencies operate in silos which require us to fill in the same information repeatedly. Data transparency between different government agencies should be the way forward, as well as interacting with each other via Application Programmable Interfaces (APIs).

Sarah Shevaun: A world class digital foundation that will cater to the digital native citizen.

William Kiong: A centralised customer service. We had Urban Transformation Centre (UTC) that centralised most public services at the same place, physically. It is time for our public services to go digital with a single sign-on app.

The way we provide services must change, we need to start from the customer lens and in this instance the rakyatImri Mokhtar

Imri Mokhtar: What would a digitalised Malaysia look like to you?


Sarah Shevaun: For me, a digital Malaysia would be an upgraded port, because that is where our money and economy comes from. Visualise a ghost port, unmanned port where all things digital that utilise massive-scale Internet of Things (IoT) automation and next generation vessel traffic management. Not only will it be more efficient, it will also reduce a lot of government operating expenditure as well.

Rakcana Kardnanithi: Accessible and efficient citizen’s journey. The future is going to be a hundred per cent co-creation and we should leverage this to create beautiful future citizen services.

William Kiong: Digital Malaysia uses information and data. It is the currency of the future. Data transparency across different government departments and agencies. Single sign-on across all government websites.

Mohamad Zulfarhan Ahmad Supiee: I think we need our own Ministry of Health App, where patients no longer need to carry multiple medical record books. Digitalise patient medical records, prescription history, information about their illness and emergency contacts.

Eeman Mansor: I would like to see Digital Malaysia in the sense that it encompasses easy accessibility to education. Using augmented reality, virtual reality, proper digital tools to improve education and provide subsidies to underprivileged students to access technology.

Asyraf Naim: Future Digital Malaysia for me is a convenience issue. Government yearly services should be auto deducted and adoption of AI to proactively help citizens manage their passport, driving license, taxes, etc.

“We need a digital coalition starting from the rakyat, the government and its technology provider to co-create the design process for citizen services. Listening to all the bright ideas from the youth made me feel like a proud father. I can’t wait to see how these youth will lead and transform our country’s future. Let’s together build our digital Malaysia! Happy Merdeka Day”Imri Mokhtar.

TRENDS AND DIGITAL STRATEGY Is Your Technology Spending Keeping Pace with Competition? – Shazurawati Abd Karim

August 30, 2021
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Shazurawati Abd Karim
Executive Vice President of TM ONE

Digital transformation, a means of ensuring business resiliency, has driven recent global technology spending to new highs. From being a mere buzzword, it has become the top priority for technology initiatives and Chief Information Officers (CIOs) across various industries. Global Information Technology (IT) research house Gartner forecasts that worldwide technology spending will grow by 9% in 2021 to reach an astonishing USD 4.2 trillion. This phenomenon reflects a tactical switch from defence to offence, as CIOs of the world’s biggest tech companies recover from the pandemic and look to extend their technological edge over the competition.

As global lockdowns cripple a plethora of industries, CIOs and Chief Technology Officers (CTOs) are more pressured than ever to hit the mark on their strategic investments. We at TM ONE are fully aware of the exacerbated need for enterprises to increase their digital capabilities and are well prepared to play our role as a digital technology partner. We believe there are four (4) key pillars to guide companies in ensuring a sound IT investment strategy:

1) Benchmark IT spend with industry standards and leaders

Regardless of which industry you operate in, market competition in today’s digital battleground strips away any luxury of taking technology investments lightly. This further magnifies the need for an incisive tech vision, one that has the backing of necessary dollars to turn it into a reality. With that in mind, Flexera’s 2020 State of Tech Spend Report states that companies from different industries, on average, spend 8.2% of their revenue on IT.

It is common to see technology spending hover around 17% of total operating costs in the banking and financial services industry (BFSI). According to Broadridge’s Next-Gen Technology Adoption Survey, this might well reach 20% by 2023. JP Morgan, for instance, is one of the top spenders, with 15% of its 2020 operating costs devoted to IT spending, which amounts to about USD 11 billion . Other large BSFI institutions such as the Bank of America (18%), Goldman Sachs (16%), and Citi (20%) reported higher proportions of operating costs spent on IT. However, this reflects an overall lower absolute value.

As the pandemic continues to immobilise healthcare institutions around the world, technology is desperately needed to reinforce vital lines of defence. Currently, the global healthcare industry on average spends 4% – 8% of revenues on technology, mostly on maintaining existing infrastructure. Industry leaders are starting to shift IT spend towards introducing new business models with digital health solutions and boosting hospital operations through big data analytics and cloudification.

With the retail and e-commerce space transforming into the forefront of new digital innovations such as Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Augmented Reality / Virtual Reality (AR/VR), technology spending becomes a key differentiator. Amazon, now known as a tech firm rather than a retailer, spent USD 43 billion or 12% of total operating costs on IT-related expenditure in 2020. With global customers demanding enhanced user experience and on-demand customisation, there are expectations for average technology spends as the portion of revenue to grow from 6.2% to 8% , especially as the competition for e-commerce leadership amplifies.

2) Maintain optimal allocation between growth spend and maintenance spend

Today, the technology stack in companies increasingly provide vital sources of economic moats. CIOs desperately need to rethink their IT spending strategy and effectively prioritise between value creation and value preservation. For many companies, huge chunks of IT budgets go towards maintaining their current business operations, which are becoming intricate due to the intertwining of new technologies. These budgets leave little to no room for innovation investments that allow CIOs to contribute directly to top-line growth, such as introducing futuristic enterprise applications or enabling analytics-driven decision making.

By and large, CIOs report less than 15% of their technology budget have an allocation for fostering innovation. We recommend successful companies set aside at least 20 – 25% of IT spend to reimagine value creation and discover new ways to disrupt the status quo in various industries creatively.

As part of our core principle, we believe that only by employing a growth spending mindset can the returns on these digital investments be seen.

3) Measure effectiveness of technology spending

Besides having to deal with strategically allocating adequate capital towards IT investments, CIOs often face one critical question – what are they getting out of the money they invest and spend? And the truth is this; most can’t give a straight answer to such a seemingly important question.

As companies compete against time to launch more and more digital initiatives, CIOs need to establish clear-cut performance metrics that can evaluate and measure digital progress effectively. With the old saying of ‘you can’t manage what you can’t measure’, tech spend on different areas need to be attributed to tangible returns. This could range from lowering sale costs/the cost of sales, new customer acquisition, revenue streams, improved customer experience, and other value adds.

We believe that using practical and measurable indicators will help narrow down your IT spending on areas of value creation, be it internally or outside the organisation.

4) Balance insourcing and outsourcing of IT needs

Whether you are a Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) or a fast-growing tech company, technology dependence changes dramatically over time. CIOs who want to optimise technology spending must consider the many implications of insourcing and outsourcing their IT needs.

Rather than establishing a fixed spending ratio between buying and building, companies should evaluate the qualitative criteria of technology spend decisions, such as its contribution to overall company growth. Short term cost savings might be attractive in outsourcing, but one must carefully consider the opportunity lost in forgoing long-term digital capabilities. Other key markers to help keep a competitive technology spend are the availability of in-house talents, existing core competencies, security, and technology ownership.

As costly-to-build technological capabilities can sometimes separate winners from losers in today’s digital warzone, taking a hybrid approach could perhaps be the best solution to sustain digital transformation efforts without dissipating technology budgets.

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