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Inside Malaysia’s Smart Village Project

February 21, 2020
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Retaining talent has always been a challenge for rural areas, but smart initiatives can be the answer to boost the economy with its focus on encouraging innovation and entrepreneurship.

Malaysia steps up on rural development initiatives with high-speed internet infrastructure and digital technologies.

The Malay word “kampung” means village but also so much more. It evokes the close-knit collectives who live in rural Malaysia; the antithesis to the atomisation of city living. Villagers rise with the chickens, and sleep when the sun sets. People keep their doors unlocked and look after their neighbours.

Malaysia’s Ministry of Rural Development wants to retain this tradition, while giving rural communities the opportunities provided to their city counterparts. In August, they signed a Memorandum of Understanding with several partners to provide smart solutions, close the digital divide, and build the digital skills of kampung dwellers. One of those companies is TM ONE.

Smart Village pilot programme

“We want to not only provide infrastructure to people in rural areas, but also strengthen the economy,” said Datuk Seri Rina Mohd Harun, the country’s Minister of Rural Development when the MoU was announced. What will the Smart Village pilot programme look like for Malaysia’s rural regions? 

First, there will be high speed internet access – up to 100Mbps. This connection will power smart classrooms and digital libraries, to give young villagers access to education comparable to those available in the cities. It will also allow for “digital marketplaces” so that villagers can sell their wares online.

Hospitals will monitor their patients’ health from city areas and deliver care via telemedicine. Meanwhile, farmers can use drones for smart farming. The Ministry is building a Smart Map, to share data in real-time, and increase flooding awareness.

The rural divide

The pilot programme will start in 191 villages, but the Ministry intends to provide it to 15,000 villages across the country. It helps to bridge the urban-rural divide, promoting new skills and economic opportunities. Entrepreneurs, students and housewives are the primary targets.

For TM ONE, TM‘s enterprise and public sector business arm, the Smart Village initiative is a vital tenet of Malaysia’s broader Digital Malaysia vision. Mohd Nazri Ambi, Director of Public Shared Services of TM ONE explained that there are three parts to building a Digital Nation: digital government, digital business and digital society. “The Smart Village initiative falls under digital society,” he shared. 

TM ONE provides connectivity infrastructure to more than 550 rural communities nationwide, with more on the way. “We want to include rural areas in our smart society,” said Mohd Nazri. “We want to become their enabler,” he added. 

On a broader scheme, the Smart Village initiative forms part of KPLB’s Rural Development Policy 2030 (DPLB 2030). This is a plan to create prosperous rural community with a focus on 10 areas spanning social, economic and environmental progress. These include the areas of entrepreneurship, human capital, sustainable biodiversity, housing and regional development.

There are high hopes for the Smart Village project. For one, “we want to create more job opportunities for the rural people so that we can minimise the migration from rural to urban regions,” Datuk Seri Rina said of her vision.

Retaining talent has always been a challenge for rural areas, but smart initiatives can be the answer. The project is also expected to boost the economy with its focus on encouraging innovation and entrepreneurship.

The focus on developing human capital instead of economic growth has allowed Malaysia to slash rural poverty rates from over 8 per cent to just 1 percent in 7 years.

Now, the Smart Village Project is that next step: building up opportunities, while retaining that crucial kampung spirit and charm.

Demystifying Technology: Debunking the Misconception of Cloud Security

April 28, 2021
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Cloud and cybersecurity must come hand in hand for any enterprises which are considering or in the midst of digital transformation.

Despite the enormous values Cloud brings to enterprises globally, it is undeniable that Cloud security has been the biggest barrier preventing technology teams from adopting Cloud at a rapid scale.

According to a recent survey by Cybersecurity Insiders, 75 per cent of respondents stated they were ‘very concerned’ or ‘extremely concerned’ about public Cloud security.

Their concerns are largely driven by data residency and security reasonings, as sensitive data will be stored off-shore due to the absence of local region. Data residency refers to where a business, industry body or government specifies that their data is stored in a geographical location of their choice, usually for regulatory or policy reasons. Data Sovereignty refers to the laws of the country in which the data is stored. Data residency and sovereignty are extremely important when considering Cloud services. Malaysian key/strategic data resides on Malaysian soil safeguarded by a national provider.

However, over recent years, cloud security is getting debunked. Many are now realising that perhaps Cloud, especially the public model, provides the best and most innovative security solution any enterprises can obtain. With such knowledge, the adoption of public Cloud has increased globally across legacy enterprises and this trend is forecasted to continue within the next 36-48 months.

By 2025, the digital economy will contribute 22.6% of the Malaysian Gross Domestic Product (GDP). In the recently announced MyDIGITAL Digital Economy Blueprint, the Prime Minister provided the assurance that “the Government will monitor the information security of data management to avoid any future cyber threats. He also mentioned that “cybersecurity and data security will be one of the main focus of the Government in realising the vision of a digitally technological nation. The data of the citizens will be managed based on the security policy provided by National Cyber Security Agency (NACSA) as the implementation agency”.

Why is Cloud often times more secure?

With reference to the previous article, Cloud can be divided into three (3) models – private, public and hybrid Cloud. Private Cloud stores data in a private environment exclusive to the enterprise and allows them to fully manage their Cloud security. Public Cloud, on the other hand, stores data in a shared environment, where enterprises surrender Cloud security management to the Cloud provider. Hybrid Cloud falls in between both models, allowing flexibility in storage and management.

Although private Cloud ensures data locality and sovereignty, there remain to be pitfalls from migrating data to this model. Three (3) of the key reasons are as follows:

  1. Limited security budget

Private Cloud is the most expensive model. The use of private Cloud requires enterprises to maintain a considerable budget for comparable personnel, administration and technology infrastructure on top of security. Often times, due to varying costs and a self-governance model, enterprises are able to only allocated a limited budget to secure their Cloud; denying their access to top-notch innovative solutions. Although private Cloud maintains the exclusivity for enterprises, it can result in poorer protection, as a result of higher cost with a limited budget which can be detrimental to the business.

  1. Lesser check and balances

The use of private Cloud is largely dependent on dedicated in-house resources to ensure frequent testing and maintenance. However, this can lead to inefficiency due to common roadblocks such as bandwidth issues, redundant testing or narrowed coverage and the need to have the right personnel with the right skills in place to keep up with evolving technology and cyber threats. As a result, the security of the Cloud is at risk despite a private infrastructure.

  1. Vendor lock-in

Although enterprises are given the option to outsource hardware and infrastructure in a private Cloud model, the biggest issue is the high reliance on a service provider. Private Cloud is a service delivery technique where enterprises are forced to continue with the same service provider, thus preventing them to migrate to another vendor. On the security front, it can be a challenge as options to improve Cloud security such as multi-Cloud adoption and new solutions integration become more rigid as enterprises would need to seek permission from the service provider and ensure compatibility of solution.

Contrary to private Cloud, public Cloud operates in a shared infrastructure model – which means data from various enterprises are stored in the same stack. However, it does not account for data being accessed by unauthorised personnel. In fact, it is quite the contrary. Public Cloud, though widely misconstrued as unsafe, offers one of the best security options to its users. Below are the key reasons:

  1. Crowdfunded security budget

In the public Cloud model, enterprises big and small pool together billions of dollars in security budgets for public Cloud providers to constantly discover and deliver best in class innovative solutions. Through this, enterprises’ data are well protected and secured by solutions that are often times beyond their range of affordability, if done in solitary.

  1. Constant surveillance by public Cloud providers

Public Cloud providers’ top priority is to ensure data security. With that in mind, renowned global providers conduct round-the-clock surveillance on their hardware and software to ensure any malicious attempts is addressed and eliminated.

  1. Attract and retain top security talent

In Southeast Asia, talent crunch is the huge barrier barring enterprises from securing their Cloud. Most of these top security talents have an unspoken preference to build their career with leading public Cloud hyperscalers. This preference could be driven by the learning opportunities and global access public Cloud providers offer. Henceforth, new security solutions are constantly being created, further securing their Cloud technology.

Why is Cloud perceived as unsecure?

How did Cloud gain negative sentiments? Unfortunately, due to notable incidents of cyberattacks and security breach in the region, it led to a sense of doubt in Cloud security amongst enterprises and governments. For instance, back in February 2021, Singtel, Singapore’s biggest telecom provider, reported a data breach resulting in 130,000 of customer data stolen by hackers.

However, security in Cloud, especially public, is often underestimated and misunderstood. Despite a data centre sharing model, leading global providers have made it a point to invest billions to secure the data of their customers with innovative automation. These providers often set a much higher bar than most enterprises when it comes to this. That said, the vulnerability to attacks sometimes lies in the migration to the Cloud process, which is managed by service partners, but it is not at the processing and storage end. A notable example is the cyber-attack on SingHealth, where IHIS was faulted for mishandling of the data causing security breaches. While on the Cloud itself, there are often limited security mishaps especially with mature providers. Therefore, Cloud security is more secure than many have perceived.

Key takeaways for business decision makers

Cloud and cybersecurity must come hand in hand for any enterprises which are considering or in the midst of digital transformation.

The selection of partners and providers is important. Enterprises should value the service vendors who practice a rigorous protocol and invest in innovative security solutions. They should place security at the centre stage of their infrastructure, to ensure the same is delivered to the customers.

How can TM ONE help?

TM ONE, the enterprise and public sector business solutions arm of Telekom Malaysia Berhad (TM) offers a comprehensive suite of solutions covering connectivity, Cloud, data centres and cybersecurity where TM ONE’s Cloud & Cybersecurity ecosystem is portrayed in the establishment of its Klang Valley Core Data Centre (KVDC) in Cyberjaya.

Meanwhile, TM ONE CYDEC Professional Services offers a complete set of cybersecurity posture assessment, consulting and advisory services that transform and enhances an organisation’s risk management capabilities by analysing and identifying the existing cyber risks in different environments (IT, OT, Cloud, IoT, etc.) and offers the solution to mitigate that risks, which best meets the customers’ needs.

A key factor that differentiates TM ONE’s full cloud capabilities delivered through TM ONE Cloud α from other Cloud services is the comprehensive offerings and multiple deployment models that align with its customer’s Cloud adoption strategy and business objectives. The innovative digital solutions are set to accelerate the digital transformation journey of our enterprise and public sector customers, and this perfectly fits our role as part of TM Group as the enabler of Digital Malaysia.

Find out how to build digital trust and cybersecurity resilience for Malaysian businesses operating in a digital ecosystem. Detect, protect and respond to your business cost-effectively, easily and flexibly. Click here to download the IDC Managed Security – Building Trust for Digital Business Success.

Trends & Digital Strategy: A Business Leader’s Guide to Cloud

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Unlike traditional infrastructure, the flexibility, accessibility and scalability of Cloud prepare enterprises and governments to stand resilient against any given circumstances and gives them competitive advantage in the market

Cloud solution has been a trending boardroom topic amongst leadership in Southeast Asia long before COVID-19.  Now with business continuity and remote working become the agenda to survive the pandemic, many have accelerated their cloud adoption and migration strategy. These proactive approaches to transform digitally can be witnessed across legacy enterprises from manufacturing to logistics.

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Southeast Asian Governments, Malaysia included, are shifting to a more favourable stance on cloud by amending national policies, creating frameworks and launching digital transformation (DX) initiatives. The Malaysia Digital Economy Blueprint, MyDIGITAL, for instance, is Malaysia’s national response to drive digitalisation amongst businesses and government agencies while bridging the digital divide across the country. To realise this ambition, in the first phase of the blueprint (2021-2022), the Government aims to move towards a paperless environment and migrate 80% of public data to hybrid Cloud systems by the end of 2022, but why?

Debunking Cloud

Although Cloud is well spoken of, the concept of how it is imperative to digital transformation remains vague to many. Hence, to understand its synonymity, it is important to debunk the technology.

Foremost, the technology can be differentiated into three (3) models:

  1. Public Cloud
    • On-demand services with instant deployments and pay-as-you-go pricing
    • Data hosted on a shared data centre, which is known as region, managed by Cloud providers
    • Businesses are able to select the location of data stored

Top three (3) advantages:

  • Highly agile and scalable – usage can be switched up or down depending on need/situation
  • Access to the top of the line and innovative security solutions invested by Cloud providers
  • Fastest deployment amongst all Cloud models
  1. Private Cloud
    • Data located in an organisation’s local data centre or hosted by third parties from certain Cloud services
    • Requires administrative, maintenance and infrastructure investment

Top three (3) advantages:

  • Highly secure – data stored in a private environment
  • High control – Ability to manage servers end-to-end
  • Adaptability – organisation customises the Cloud environment based on specific business needs
  1. Hybrid Cloud
    • Combines the private and public Cloud into one (1) Cloud model
    • A portion of data hosted in own local data centre, the remainder to be hosted on shared data centre
    • Users allowed to switch between Cloud types at any time

Top three (3) advantages:

  • Enjoys security advantages of both Cloud models
  • Middle ground pricing – selection of Cloud environment depending on data sensitivity
  • Flexibility of deployment – provides the ability to choose and decide

Within each model, Cloud is further defined by its service types with differing level of responsibilities between the user and service providers.

Unlike traditional infrastructure, the flexibility, accessibility and scalability of Cloud prepare enterprises and governments to stand resilient against any given circumstances and allow them to act quickly to ensure competitive advantage in the market.

Cloud in action – how Cloud is used in Southeast Asia?

  1. Data backup and disaster recovery

All enterprises, across industries and sizes, experience data loss caused by unintentional events such as system failures and natural disasters. While there are methods to prevent data-loss events, the most effective data-protection method is having an enterprise-wide backup solution.

However, with the exponential growth of data worldwide, backup solutions are required to be comprehensive. Traditional backup methods such as tape libraries are unable to quickly scale to this growth and maintaining them can be extremely cost-intensive.

Thus, a growing number of organisations are moving on-premises backup capabilities to the Cloud in order to accommodate this data growth. Some of the benefits include:

  • Data durability and resiliency
    • Public Cloud providers copy and distribute every object across a few geographically separated regions.
  • Cost efficacy
    • Varied storage options at wide-range pricing offered by Cloud providers allows enterprises to reduce spending on archivable data and pay for what they use without compromising performance.
  1. Data analytics

In today’s data-driven environment, enterprises are required to overcome data silo challenges and find efficient and innovative ways to uncover hidden insights within their data to remain competitive. However, to build constantly evolving capabilities in-house is no easy task, hence leading digital companies e.g. Netflix, or regional favourites e.g. Grab, look towards Cloud providers and their partners for such solutions. They provide real-time analytics, big data processing and more which enable enterprises to streamline its business intelligence process of gathering, integrating and presenting insights to enhance business decision making.

What are the values for enterprises?

  • Ability to understand the trend and consumer behaviour on demand
  • Fast access to necessary data, regardless of type and sources, to find strategic insights
  • Fully managed infrastructure – allow cost saving in maintenance and administration front
  1. Research and development for innovation

In Southeast Asia, more and more enterprises are using Cloud for innovation projects. Those that do not look lean on Cloud for R&D, seem to lack behind their counterparts who do. This is simply because upfront technology investment into on-premise infrastructure is heavy and procurement periods are long, barring them from constant innovation to address consumer needs. On the contrary, Cloud is readily available, can be scaled down or up, and is armed with various tools and software to support innovation. Thus in terms of cost, timeframe and manpower, Cloud is an indisputable option for R&D.

Cloud optimisation demands for partners

One of the biggest challenges for Cloud adoption in Southeast Asia remains to be the talent crunch. This challenge is extremely prevalent in Indonesia as they house only about 75,000 IT engineers in the country, while they require at least 10x the number to fully sustain a digital economy.

Furthermore, digital talent often aims to work in digital companies, which impedes the digital journey of legacy enterprises. Hence, Cloud service providers play a vital role in the region as they have the people, experience and capability and they provide end-to-end support to ensure true Cloud optimisation.

Celebrating Success: Delivering educational excellence through Cloud Services

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The restrictions imposed in 2020 on in-person classes resulted in a large-scale shift towards online-based classes. E-learning platforms existed long before the pandemic; however, recently, these platforms took centre stage in delivering educational content.

Every major service sector is under pressure to adapt to the current circumstances, and the education sector is no exception. Significant adjustments were needed across educational institutions to move onto the reality of having minimal face-to-face interaction. This case is especially true with the tertiary education sector, which has to provide its services across international borders.

The restrictions imposed in 2020 on in-person classes resulted in a large-scale shift towards online-based classes. E-learning platforms existed long before the pandemic; however, recently, these platforms took centre stage in delivering educational content. Consequently, it resulted in an upsurge in virtual classrooms, as well as a suite of remote services, including teaching, workshops and examinations.

These options provide support for students disrupted by the closure of universities. However, these e-learning platforms require a scalable yet flexible and reliable IT infrastructure. Hence, this situation requires institutions to re-evaluate the said infrastructure to manage the demands of their staff and students.

Here, we share some success stories from the education institues that have embraced digital transformation as an opportunity to bring better learning experiences for its students.

Universiti Sultan Azlan Shah (USAS), adapting to circumstances

USAS was granted full university status on 15 June 2016. The institution offers a variety of courses from foundational studies to PhDs. Its campus, located at Bukit Chandan, Kuala Kangsar,was completed in 2008. USAS currently offers 47 courses in Islamic Studies and multiple subjects under Management and Information Technology. Currently, USAS has the support of 198 lecturers and serves nearly 5600 students.While it still has traditional systems in place, USAS is a key example on how educational institutions can adapt to changing circumstances. The upgrades implemented by the university enables effective online leaning for students and lecturers too.

Breaking free from traditional systems and their limitations

To manage the demand for remote learning, USAS transformed to a cloud-based IT infrastructure from a traditional on-premise setting. The former on-premise system required high amounts of capital investments, labour, and maintenance. For example, on-premise systems typically require higher investments in hardware,including logistics and setup processes. During the lockdown periods, the response time to scale was severely affected by supply chain disruptions. Moreover, in terms of maintenance, IT teams must be on-site to respond to any system glitches encountered.

Such limitations often result in higher costs to support the IT infrastructure. These experiences limit the ability of USAS to scale efficiently and match the demand for remote learning.  Due to these limitations, USAS considered engaging TM ONE to adopt a cloud-based learning management system.

“The decision to engage TM ONE was due to its capabilities of providing end-to-end technological solutions inclusive of connectivity, cloud services and cybersecurity, catered specifically for the education sector,” said a USAS C-Level representative.

Reaping the benefits from cloud migration

  1. Tackling limited scalability with cloud-based solutions

The success of cloud and its effects on universities’ performance is spoken of widely in the education industry globally.The surge of users using online platforms, which posed a scalability challenge with on-premise servers, was addressed with cloud solutions. Using cloud platforms, educational institutions can scale depending on the activity and user base in a cost-efficient manner.

In this very manner, USAS could efficiently scale up or down based on its usage. This ability allowed USAS to tap into the readily available capacity from TM ONE on a scalable pay-as-you-go basis. USAS reported that it could have 800 students sit for exam sessions concurrently on the renewed cloud-based system, compared to 200 students on the legacy platform.

  1. Cost-benefits on upgrades and maintenance

Other than scalability, USAS was also able to capture significant cost-saving benefits by migrating onto cloud platforms. For example, leveraging cloud technology allows USAS to have lower hardware dependency. Therefore, USAS can focus more on operational expenses, resulting in higher flexibility on its expenses. Unlike on-premise systems where universities were responsible for upgrades and maintenance – cloud-based systems are primarily managed by the cloud provider. This shift in responsibility significantly reduces the financial burden on universities to manage their data storage systems and infrastructures.

These benefits also extend to the IT department, which can now focus on higher-value services rather than on maintenance work. Moreover, the IT Department has the added advantage of being able to conduct support work online safely. As a result, the IT team of USAS noted improvements in their Mean Time to Restore (MTR). In the case of upgrades, the USAS IT team can activate upgrades within 48-hours, allowing them to increase efficiency and reduce costs.

Improving user experience for both students and staff

Ultimately, these benefits aims towards enhancing the services for students and lecturers. By leveraging the power of the cloud, USAS can now provide higher-quality content to its students. This leverage is crucial to compensate for the difficulties faced by lecturers due to the loss of physical interaction.

Feedback from the students noted that the performances of past on-premise servers made it difficult for them to learn through digital platforms. The students claimed that they were affected by long loading times and lags. The alternative at that point was to use the platform during off-peak periods, which was inconvenient.

The scalability, efficiency and performance of the cloud provide the robust infrastructure for a conducive learning environment. For example, during crucial exam periods, the cloud reduces system glitches by providing the needed scale.  Students can now enjoy a smoother delivery of classes and have real-time responses with their lecturers, leading to an augmented learning experience.

Local counterpart leveraging cloud beyond the classroom

Apart from delivering in-classroom benefits, education institutions are also able to utilise the cloud to enhance customer servicing. A local counterpart, Universiti Teknologi Petronas (UTP), teamed up with TM ONE in 2018 by adopting a Unified Customer Service (UCS) powered by cloud. The service provided has a consumption-based business model to manage customer interactions for customer experience.

This solution offers an effective way of managing customers by having a one-stop-centre approach. Post-adoption, UTP had expanded its contact centre services from 5 departments in 2018 to 25 departments in 2020. TM assisted UTP by handling more than 1000 interactions monthly, achieving an average of 95% in performance levels. Along with other improvements, these efforts were recognised regionally, with UTP awarded the CXP Best Customer Experience Award in 2020.

The success UTP experienced with the power of cloud technology is not foreign to their peers. UTP was amongst the first educational institution in Malaysia to drive a cloud transformation strategy. After signing a three-year MOU with Microsoft back in 2017, UTP has been a transformative player by integrating tools such as Azure, Power BI, and Machine Learning to future-proof its students and staff. These initiatives were part of a wider goal of improving its capabilities for its educational services and drive operational efficiency.

Learning from global leaders in the education industry

Despite the challenges posed by the pandemic, leading universities are using this period as an opportunity to further drive the adoption of cloud services. For example, The London School of Economics (LSE)  followed through with complementary changes to streamline its financial and business management systems. By engaging with a technology partner, LSE now uses a cloud SaaS solution to manage its finances, budgeting and procurements. This enhancement frees up the staff to focus on providing higher levels of service to their students.

On the other hand, Standford University (SU) shows that adequate training must supplement cloud adoption strategies. Observing its cloud transformation journey, the university made clear communication plans to prepare its staff for the upcoming changes.  SU deployed several training programs and communication channels to prepare its staff technically in handling the changes. These steps are crucial to provide confidence for lecturers and supporting staff to embrace the cloud’s capabilities.

As cloud technology continues to grow into a necessity in the education sector, adopters need to have the right information and expertise. Whilst the benefits are clear, misconfigurations can often lead to cybersecurity concerns. Hence,a technology partner is often regarded as a preferred option for institutions to integrate cloud-based solutions. Similar to USAS and UTP, cloud services work best with collaboration. This way, institutions can rest at ease knowing that their cloud strategy is backed by reputable expertise, bringing the full potential of the cloud to the forefront.

Trends & Digital Strategy: Changing Gears – From Caution to Jumpstart

March 26, 2021
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At the heart of digital transformation are the technologies and technology platforms that serve as catalysts for change. It is on this foundation that the pillars of Digital Malaysia will find their footing. TM ONE understands and realises the power, significance, and impact that these technologies have in enabling digital change.
  • Ahmad Taufek Omar, Executive Vice President/Chief Executive Officer, TM ONE

Decades from now, when historians look back on today and write our history, how will they describe this epoch? What grand, sweeping theme will they say is the characteristic of our age? The polarisation of our beliefs? The rise of narrative economics and capitalist power? Or will we be remembered as the generation that squandered a chance to course-correct environmental imbalance?

History will define us as the age of transformation. They will say that we live in the greatest bout of compressed, complex, life-altering transformation humankind has ever experienced. If you take a closer look at the themes that characterise our age; the root causes of our best moments, our achievements, our learned traits and behaviours, and our greatest excesses and ailments–the stuff that makes us, us–and it can be traced back to transformation. A transformation of a very specific kind.

This transformation has helped the world’s best pharmaceutical companies to bring out a vaccine in record time. It has enabled us to make swift advances in diverse areas such as electric mobility to food technology and astronomy.  Companies and governments have come together to collaborate to help solve the biggest challenge faced by our generation. All of these are defining characteristics of our time and they are tied together with a single invisible string: Digital transformation.

Digital Transformation in Malaysia

digital transformation digital business future business

Before the pandemic, Malaysia has had a slower pivot to digital transformation. The country was ranked 38 out of 141 countries in Cisco’s Global digital readiness index. According to IDC, 55% of Malaysian organisations do not have an integrated enterprise-wide digital transformation strategy, and 91% of Malaysian enterprises are either on stage one or two, of a five-stage IDC maturity curve. The results are not surprising due to the complexity and risk associated with every digital transformation initiative. It is a multi-year, multi-stakeholder, enterprise-wide effort that requires vision, and changes to people, process and technology. It requires multi-domain expertise spanning business and technology, which is hard for enterprises to acquire. The positive news however is the rapid digital adoption of digital services across the board during Covid-19. SME businesses also moved to online and adopted social media and e-commerce platforms to gradually build digital led revenue streams.   Many companies have begun shifting their business approach, from traditional lead to more digital lead.    

MyDigital – Jumpstarting a new future

After the very challenging 2020, the global business and political environment is now getting ready for a renewed growth agenda. Companies and leaders need to prepare for this next decade of growth by leveraging all the positives that digital transformation has helped us achieve. This calls for a new growth mindset amongst all stakeholders including the government. Leading ahead, the Malaysian Government has been quick to respond with a very ambitious MyDIGITAL – Malaysian Digital Economy Blueprint, an action plan with initiatives to be implemented till 2030. With six (6) different thrust areas, it is a  comprehensive plan with milestones for success across the three (3) dimensions of citizens, businesses and government. It aspires to create 500,000 new jobs, 5000 new start-ups and a rapid migration to digital for government and citizen services. The government’s adoption of digital will be a catalyst for the entire nation in the journey to building an inclusive society for all Malaysians.

TM ONE: Taking Transformation Forward towards empowering Digital Malaysia

At the heart of digital transformation are the technologies and technology platforms that serve as catalysts for change. It is on this foundation that the pillars of Digital Malaysia will find their footing. TM ONE understands and realises the power, significance, and impact that these technologies have in enabling digital change.

To facilitate and accelerate digital adoption, TM ONE has built its offerings along four (4) technology pillars that underpin digital transformation – Cloud Computing, Cybersecurity, Connectivity and Smart Services. While each of these pillars are individually very important, the convergence between them enables the curation of new customer and business experiences. 

While technology is important, the effective implementation can only happen through collaboration with stakeholders across the entire ecosystem. As the enterprise and public sector business solutions arm of Telekom Malaysia Berhad (TM), TM ONE is well positioned as the ENABLER for businesses to realise their full potential of their digital opportunities. We are privileged to have this opportunity to play a role in bringing the ecosystem together.

This monthly insight platform is our attempt to connect and collaborate with you on “Taking Transformation Forward”. Every month, we hope to bring you insights into business strategy, demystifying technology as well as sharing of best practices on companies, government agencies and even individuals leading the way for us as a nation. We welcome your feedback, ideas and innovation stories. Let’s connect, collaborate and build a better future for all Malaysians. 

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